Winter is for the ducks

If you ask me, the best thing about winter is ducks. I may have mentioned before how much I love ducks, and the last two weekends I’ve had some really great duck-watching! I’m not sure if its something to do with the weather or if there are normally so many about, but I felt like I’ve seen a nice variety in species.

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a party of ducks down at Esquimalt Lagoon

Last weekend, I went down to the Esquimalt Lagoon (always an excellent duck destination) on a cold, but sunny day. There are usually quite a few ducks there, but I thought I saw more than usual last week. Perhaps it was because so many of them were clustered close to the shore.

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American Wigeons
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Common Goldeneye

Whatever the reason, there were heaps of American Wigeons (a large flock tends to hang out at the lagoon), their greens heads just brilliant in the sunlight, as well as Buffleheads, Mallards, Northern Pintails and even a couple of Common Goldeneyes. As I walked along the shore, watching the big group, I also spotted a stray Eurasian Wigeon, his red head conspicuous in a sea of green and brown.

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American Wigeon and Northern Pintail – what a size difference!

 

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Eurasian Wigeon

Watching ducks just makes me happy; the way they waddle awkwardly onshore while moving so gracefully on the water with their various quacks and colours just makes me happy.

Besides enjoying the ducks, I also saw a group of shorebirds right on the edge of the water who I didn’t recognise. After much debate and consulting Sibley, I decided they were Dunlins, which would be a new bird for me. I find shorebirds tricky and I sometimes I’m still not sure just who I am looking at.

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Dunlins

Meanwhile, high up in the sky about as far from the shore as you could get, I saw a familiar bird soaring high and veering and tilting every now and again. Much to my surprise, a Turkey Vulture hovered overhead, another was perched in a tree and I later saw two others flying overhead.

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A winter Turkey Vulture

I thought it would be too cold for them by now and they must all have gone south already, but I suppose there’s always bound to be a few stragglers. I wonder if its harder for them to find food in the winter because they rely so much on their sense of smell to locate carrion. Besides all the ducks, unexpectedly seeing one of my favourite raptors was pretty exciting! It just goes to show you never know who you might encounter when you go outside bird watching.

Duck, Duck, Goose, Part 1: delighting wigeons and beautiful buffleheads

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Mallard Duck, a common resident of urban parks

Before the beginning of my birding days, I was always a big fan of ducks. While I can never decide what type of birds are my favourite, ducks will always be one of the contenders. There’s just something about their quacks and other noises, their webbed feet, the way they land on the water and how it beads on their feathers. And they are really cute, which helps. Each spring, I keenly look forward to baby mallard duck season and they will always be an old favourite. And despite the fact that mallard ducks are considered an invasive pest in New Zealand, when I lived there, I still loved them. They are, after all, what most people think of when you say ducks…but there are a lot more ducks out there than you think.

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American Wigeon

The American Wigeon is a dabbling duck commonly found in western North American lakes, wetlands and ponds and increasingly further east. They commonly breed in the far northwest and winters in the Pacific Northwest to California, Texas and east to Florida.1  The male has a distinctive white crown and a green band across the eye.2, 3 Unlike many other dabbling ducks, the American Wigeon often grazes in fields as well as on water, where they often wait to steal meals off other ducks.4

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American Wigeons (female, male)
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Eurasian Wigeon

An occasional American Wigeon can sometimes be found across the pond in Europe among Eurasian Wigeons. Likewise, the Eurasian Wigeon is occasionally found in western North America commonly within groups of their American counterparts like the one I saw at Beacon Hill Park in Victoria. While they look quite similar, the main difference I spot is the lack of a green eye band in the Eurasian species.5

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Buffleheads (male)

Buffleheads are diving seaducks appearing on the Sidney, BC coat of arms where All Buffleheads Day is celebrated each year in October when the ducks arrive for their winter stay. 6 I better enjoy them while they last, it will be spring soon. They have a beautifully striking white patch on the back of the head and shiny green-purple plumage. Each year, they often mate with the same partner and nest in abandoned Northern Flicker holes.7, 8, 9

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Bufflehead (female)

Coming up in part 2 will be some mergansers and the titular goose…