The Wild Animal Sanctuary outside Denver, CO

Back in June, I went on another trip to the Denver area and I’ve gotten wildly behind on blogging this year with other things happening. I’ve been wanting to write about the Wild Animal Sanctuary east of Denver, CO. I am quite skeptical about animal and wildlife-related tourist attractions. And just after my trip, I read a stirring and depressing account on wildlife tourism in a National Geographic article while waiting in a doctor’s office.

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Lion in the grass at the sanctuary

 

But while contemplating things to do in Denver and seeing the wildlife sanctuary, I thought I’d go see what it was all about. We went to visit with my skepticism fully switched on but pretty soon after arriving, it was quickly replaced with appreciation and inspiration. My appreciation was not only for the animals themselves, but for the sanctuary itself.

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Jaguar among the grass

Because it is just that. It is not a zoo. It is not a tourist attraction. Its truly a safe haven for these animals after some of them faced a lifetime of abuse, neglect and mistreatment. The enclosures are large, grassy expanses with sun and shade, trees and tunnels and all kinds of habitat enrichment. There are enclosures for all kinds of bear, large cats (tiger, lions, cougars, jaguars and leopards) and small (bobcats and lynx), foxes, coyote, wolves and hyenas. There are also camels, emus, ostrich, porcupines, raccoons, alpacas and horses.

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A lion having a well-deserved nap in the sun
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Grizzly bear also enjoying a cozy snooze

But where do these animals come from? Their stories are heartbreaking. Countless animals were brought into homes as pets when young and soon shuffled to sheds or small cages, never to see the sun or feel the touch of grass beneath their paws. Film industry lions who no longer obeyed their Hollywood trainers and bears used for bear baiting by hunters. Tigers were rescued from breeders who kept kittens alive only as long as they remained cute subjects for tourist photos. Animals were evicted from closed zoos that could no longer house them. Each animal’s story is available to read here.

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Rescued black bear at the sanctuary

The sanctuary really seems to know what they’re doing. They provide veterinary care, often much -needed when the animals first arrive. They have a special tiger facility used to ease them into a new environment individually, then with other tigers. They give animals the time they need to adjust and monitor their progress. Every animal has shade and shelter. Bears and tigers get pools and even man-made waterfalls to play in since water is so essential to them. Wolves live in family packs like they would in the wild.

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Wolf at the sanctuary

These animals are lucky to have a better life than they had before being rescued by the sanctuary. But I still wish there was no need for such a sanctuary to even exist. If legislation restricted the ownership of exotic animals and no one kept bears, tigers or wolves as pets anymore and people followed the law, the Denver Wildlife Sanctuary could happily shut its doors. These wild animals are not pets, movie characters or photo props. They are living, breathing, beautiful beings and they should live in the wild, undisturbed and truly be wild.

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This wolf was howling to the others

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